Table of Contents
preliminars
info. info
1. Introduction to the GNU/Linux operating system
preface. preface
1.2. Free Software and Open Source
1.3. UNIX. A bit of history
1.4. GNU/Linux systems
1.5. The profile of the systems administrator
1.6. Tasks of the administrator
1.7. GNU/Linux distributions
1.7.1. Debian
1.7.2. Fedora Core
1.8. What we will look at...
activities. activities
Bibliography
2. Migration and coexistence with non-Linux systems
preface. preface
2.2. Computer systems: environments
2.3. GNU/Linux services
2.4. Types of use
2.5. Migration or coexistence
2.5.1. Identify service requirements
2.5.2. Migration process
2.6. Migration workshop: case study analysis
2.6.1. Individual migration of a Windows desktop user to a GNU/Linux system
2.6.2. Migration of a small organisation with Windows systems and a few UNIX
2.6.3. Migration of a standalone Windows server to a Samba server running GNU/Linux
activities. activities
Bibliography
3. Basic tools for the administrator
preface. preface
3.2. Graphics tools and command line
3.3. Standards
3.4. System documentation
3.5. Shell scripting
3.5.1. Interactive shells
3.5.2. Shells
3.5.3. System variables
3.5.4. Programming scripts in Bash
3.6. Package management tools
3.6.1. TGZ package
3.6.2. Fedora/Red Hat: RPM packages
3.6.3. Debian: DEB packages
3.7. Generic administration tools
3.8. Other tools
activities. activities
Bibliography
4. Linux kernel
preface. preface
4.2. The kernel of the GNU/Linux system
4.3. Configuring or updating the kernel
4.4. Configuration and compilation process
4.4.1. Kernel compilation versions 2.4.x
4.4.2. Migration to kernel 2.6.x
4.4.3. Compilation of the kernel versions 2.6.x
4.4.4. Compilation of the kernel in Debian (Debian way)
4.5. Patching the kernel
4.6. Kernel modules
4.7. Future of the kernel and alternatives
4.8. Tutorial: configuring de kernel to the requirements of the user
4.8.1. Configuring the kernel in Debian
4.8.2. Configuring the kernel in Fedora/Red Hat
4.8.3. Configuring a generic kernel
activities. activities
Bibliography
5. Local administration
preface. preface
5.2. Distributions: special features
5.3. Boot and run levels
5.4. Monitoring system state
5.4.1. System boot
5.4.2. kernel: /proc directory
5.4.3. kernel: /sys
5.4.4. Processes
5.4.5. System Logs
5.4.6. Memory
5.4.7. Disks and file systems
5.5. File systems
5.5.1. Mount point
5.5.2. Permissions
5.6. Users and groups
5.7. Printing services
5.7.1. BSD LPD
5.7.2. LPRng
5.7.3. CUPS
5.8. Disk management
5.8.1. RAID software
5.8.2. Logical Volume Manager (LVM)
5.9. Updating Software
5.10. Batch jobs
5.11. Tutorial: combined practices of the different sections
activities. activities
Bibliography
6. Network administration
preface. preface
6.2. Introduction to TCP/IP (TCP/IP suite)
6.2.1. Services on TCP/IP
6.2.2. What is TCP/IP?
6.2.3. Physical network devices (hardware)
6.3. TCP/IP Concepts
6.4. How to assign an Internet address
6.5. How to configure the network
6.5.1. Configuration of the network interface controller (NIC)
6.5.2. Configuration of Name Resolver
6.5.3. Configuration of routing
6.5.4. Configuration of inetd
6.5.5. Additional configuration: protocols and networks
6.5.6. Security aspects
6.5.7. IP Options
6.6. DHCP Configuration
6.7. IP aliasing
6.8. IP Masquerade
6.9. NAT with kernel 2.2 or higher
6.10. How to configure a DialUP and PPP connection
6.11. Configuring the network through hotplug
6.12. Virtual private network (VPN)
6.12.1. Simple example
6.13. Advanced configurations and tools
activities. activities
annex. Annex. Controlling the services linked to an FC6 network.
7. Server administration
preface. preface
7.2. Domain name system (DNS)
7.2.1. Cache names server
7.2.2. Forwarders
7.2.3. Configuration of an own domain
7.3. NIS (YP)
7.3.1. ¿How do we initiate a local NIS client in Debian?
7.3.2. What resources must be specified in order to use NIS?
7.3.3. How should we execute a master NIS server?
7.3.4. How should we configure a server?
7.4. Remote connection services: telnet and ssh
7.4.1. Telnet and telnetd
7.4.2. Secure shell or SSH
7.5. File transfer services: FTP
7.5.1. FTP client (conventional)
7.5.2. FTP servers
7.6. Information exchange services at user level
7.6.1. The mail transport agent (MTA)
7.6.2. Internet message access protocol (IMAP)
7.6.3. News
7.6.4. World Wide Web (httpd)
7.7. Proxy Service: Squid
7.7.1. Squid as an http accelerator
7.7.2. Squid as proxy-caching
7.8. OpenLdap (Ldap)
7.8.1. Creating and maintaining the database
7.9. File services (NFS)
7.9.1. Wiki server
activities. activities
Bibliography
8. Data administration
preface. preface
8.2. PostgreSQL
8.2.1. How should we create a DB?
8.2.2. How can we access a DB?
8.2.3. SQL language
8.2.4. Installing PostgreSQL
8.2.5. Maintenance
8.2.6. Pgaccess
8.3. Mysql
8.3.1. Installation
8.3.2. Post-installation and verification
8.3.3. The MySQL monitor program (client)
8.3.4. Administration
8.3.5. Graphic interfaces
8.4. Source Code management systems
8.4.1. Revision control system (RCS)
8.4.2. Concurrent versions system (CVS)
8.4.3. Graphic interfaces
8.5. Subversion
activities. activities
Bibliography
9. Security administration
preface. preface
9.2. Types and methods of attack
9.2.1. Techniques used in the attacks
9.2.2. Countermeasures
9.3. System security
9.4. Local security
9.4.1. Bootloaders
9.4.2. Passwords and shadows
9.4.3. Suid and sticky bits
9.4.4. Enabling hosts
9.4.5. PAM modules
9.4.6. System alterations
9.5. SELinux
9.5.1. Architecture
9.5.2. Criticism
9.6. Network security
9.6.1. Service client
9.6.2. Server: inetd and xinetd
9.7. Intrusion detection
9.8. Filter protection through wrappers and firewalls
9.8.1. Firewalls
9.8.2. Netfilter: IPtables
9.8.3. Packets of firewalls in the distributions
9.8.4. Final considerations
9.9. Security tools
9.10. Logs analysis
9.11. Tutorial: tools for security analysis
activities. activities
Bibliography
10. Configuration, tuning and optimisation
preface. preface
10.2. Basic aspects
10.2.1. Monitoring on a UNIX System V
10.2.2. Optimising the system
10.2.3. General optimisations
10.2.4. Additional configurations
10.2.5. Monitoring
activities. activities
Bibliography
11. Clustering
preface. preface
11.2. Introduction to High Performance Computing (HPC)
11.2.1. Beowulf
11.2.2. How should we program to take advantage of concurrent computing?
11.3. OpenMosix
11.4. Metacomputers, grid computing
11.4.1. Different computing architectures
11.4.2. Globus
11.4.3. Software, installation and administration of Globus
activities. activities
annex. GNU Free Documentation License
Bibliography
List of Tables
9-1. Some of the main commands:
List of Examples
1-1. Note
1-2. Note
1-3. Note
1-4. Note
1-5. Note
1-6. Note
1-7. Note
1-8. Note
1-9. Note
1-10. Note
1-11. Note
1-12. Note
1-13. Example
1-14. Example
1-15. Note
1-16. Note
1-17. Note
1-18. Note
2-1. Note
2-2. Example
2-3. Example
2-4. Web sites
2-5. Note
2-6. Example
2-7. Example
2-8. Note
2-9. Note
2-10. Note
2-11. Example
2-12. Note
2-13. Note
2-14. Example
2-15. Note
3-1. Note
3-2. Note
3-3. Note
3-4. Note
3-5. Example
3-6. Note
3-7. Note
3-8. Note
3-9. Note
3-10. Example
3-11. Note
3-12. Note
3-13. Note
3-14. Example
3-15. Note
3-16. Note
4-1. Note
4-2. Note
4-3. Note
4-4. Note
4-5. Note
4-6. Note
4-7. Note
4-8. Note
4-9. Note
4-10. Note
4-11. Example
4-12. Note
4-13. Web site
4-14. Web site
4-15. Reference
5-1. Note
5-2. Note
5-3. Note
5-4. Note
5-5. Note
5-6. Example
5-7. Note
5-8. Web site
5-9. Web sites
5-10. Web site
5-11. Example
5-12. Example
5-13. Example
5-14. Example
5-15. Note
5-16. Note
6-1. Note
6-2. Example
6-3. Note
6-4. Note
6-5. Note
6-6. Note
6-7. Note
6-8. Note
6-9. Note
6-10. Example
6-11. Note
6-12. Example: Configure WiFi in Debian Sarge (Etch) (similar in FC6)
6-13. Example of /etc/resolv.conf
6-14. Example of /etc/host.conf
6-15. Example of /etc/hosts
6-16. Example of loopback
6-17. Note
6-18. Note
6-19. Example of /etc/protocols
6-20. Example of /etc/networks
6-21. Example of access.conf
6-22. Example
7-1. Example
8-1. Example
8-2. Example
8-3. Example
8-4. Recommend Reading
8-5. Examples
8-6. Note
8-7. Example
8-8. Summary of the installation of PostgreSQL:
8-9. Note
8-10. Web site
9-1. Note
9-2. Note
9-3. Note
9-4. Note
9-5. Web sites
9-6. Web site
9-7. Web sites
9-8. Web site
9-9. Web site
9-10. Note
9-11. Web site
9-12. Web site
9-13. Web site
9-14. Web sites
9-15. Note
9-16. Note
9-17. Examples
9-18. Note
9-19. Note
9-20. Web site
9-21. Note
9-22. Web site
9-23. Note
10-1. Note
10-2. Note
10-3. Note
10-4. Note
11-1. Note
11-2. Note
11-3. Note
11-4. Example of PVM: master.c
11-5. Note
11-6. Example of PVM: client.c
11-7. Point-to-point communications: srtest.c
11-8. Calculation of distributed PI: cpi.c

GNU/Linux advanced administration

Revision History
2010-12-15+01:00Revised by: UOC
XML to docbook Conversion
Eureca Media, S.L. FUOC

Av. Tibidabo, 39-43, 08035 Barcelona

2009-09-01 1 Remo Suppi Boldrito Josep Jorba Esteve

Senior engineer and PhD in IT of the Universidad Autónoma de Barcelona (UAB). Professor of IT, Multimedia and Telecommunications Studies of the Open University of Catalonia (UOC).

GNUFDL

PID_00148360 PID_00148359 PID_00148358 XX07_M2103_02279

The authors would like to thank the Foundation of the Universitat Oberta de Catalunya (http://www.uoc.edu) for funding the first edition of this work and its subsequent revisions, as part of the International Master course in Free Software offered at the UOC.